India Secure Series Win in Thrilling Ranchi Test

-Karthik Gurumurthy

India clinched a hard-fought victory over England at Ranchi, winning the fourth Test by five wickets and taking an unassailable 3-1 lead in the series. The match was a captivating battle, with both teams showcasing their talent.

Key Highlights

  • Ashwin's Spin Magic: Ravichandran Ashwin was exceptional with the ball for India. In England's second innings, he ripped through the batting order with a magnificent five-wicket haul, once again demonstrating his mastery of spin bowling. I personally feel Rohit missed a trick during the first game for not giving the new ball to Ashwin. Ashwin  has a great history against Pope and Duckett but I am not sure how Rohit missed seeing it. Sometimes it feels  like watching a movie where everyone knows the glaring error in the main character but for the main guy.  I sincerely hope and pray they know how to effectively use the team well.
  • Jurel's Gritty Resilience: Wicketkeeper-batter Dhruv Jurel showcased nerves of steel for India. His unbeaten 39 in the fourth innings, including a crucial partnership with Shubman Gill, proved critical in steering India towards victory. He'd also scored a valuable 90 runs in the first innings which won us the match. The way Kuldeep and Jurel played was simply outstanding and that partnership made all the difference between the teams along with Ashwin's wizardry.
  • Gill's Composed Chase: Shubman Gill's unbeaten 52 guided India home. His composure under pressure was outstanding, and his partnership with Jurel sealed the deal for India.
  • Rohit's Opening Salvo: India's captain, Rohit Sharma, set the tone for the match with a fluent innings early on, providing a solid platform for his team.
  • Root's Lone Fight: For England, Joe Root was a lone warrior, playing a valiant innings despite a lack of support from his teammates. I felt bad for Root and felt irritated when Anderson and other tailenders got out irresponsibly. They could have rotated strike and have him bat longer but for some reason dug their own grave in the first innings.

Overall it  was a great match to watch which is a good advertisement for the test game.


Ameen Sayani

-Karthik Gurumurthy

You have heard the announcement havent you. There is a lump in my throat even as I read the words. 'Golden voice Ameen Sayani no more'. 

What an influence he was on those of us who grew up in the 1960s to 1980s era! Binaca Geetmala! Bournvita Quiz Contest! What felicity and elegance of expression! Learnt all the lovely Hindi film songs listening to his presentations. Used to wait every week to listen to the lively insights he gave in his sonorous voice. His memories will continue to crop up ,each time we hear a song.  Atma Shanti

End of an era.


Importance of Lifelong learning

-Karthik Gurumurthy

Dr. Louis Brus delivered his Nobel Prize lecture today  at the Aula Magna, Stockholm University. He was introduced by Professor Heiner Linke, Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry. He was awarded the Nobel Prize this year for his work in Quantum dots.

“We’re all trapped by our educational backgrounds. You come out of school knowing a certain field but you don’t know about any other fields of science. That limits what you can do for sure. The way to combat this is to every day learn something new. I tell my grad students that the greatest skill they have is to continue to learn by themselves after they have left graduate school. Most of the things I have used in my life are things that were invented after I left graduate school and I had to keep learning just to keep up with the field.”- Louis Brus

You can watch the entire lecture here.

Continuous learning is the key to staying relevant in an ever-evolving world. Louis Brus's perspective resonates deeply – the ability to adapt and acquire new knowledge independently is indeed a priceless skill.

It's fascinating to hear about Louis Brus's emphasis on continual learning beyond formal education, especially in a field as dynamic as science.

It reinforces the idea that success isn't just about innate genius, but about a commitment to growth and staying curious. 


Life lessons

-Karthik Gurumurthy

From a young age, I've harbored a deep desire to become a valuable member of society. I believe that each of us has a unique purpose and the potential to make a positive impact on the world around us. As I look ahead to this new chapter, I encourage all of you to consider how you too can become valuable members of society. It's not about fame or fortune, but rather about the lasting impact we leave on the lives of others.

As I step into my 50s, I am filled with gratitude for the journey thus far and excitement for the adventures that lie ahead. My wish is that each of you embarks on your own journey of becoming a valuable member of society, leaving a legacy that shines brightly for generations to come.

Thank you for being a part of my journey, and let's continue to inspire and uplift one another.

For my birthday, I have shared a list of lessons to document on the lessons I have learned over the years.

  • Stop talking and start doing. NOW!
  • Get over yourself. Anything worth doing is worth sucking at it…at first.
  • Be your own boss—no matter who you work for.
  • Please make sure your wife is well taken care of. Marriage is a garden that requires consistent attention to flourish.
  • Give your kids the gift of working through their own struggles.
  • Assume any text, email, or anything in writing will become public.
  • Embrace change before it’s forced on you.
  • Stop arguing and start listening. You don’t win people over with logic. You win them over by listening.
  • Be generous with your time, ideas, attention, smiles, compliments, and money.
  • Remember the Caterpillar and the Butterfly. In your struggle to break out of your darkest moments, you transform into something new and build the strength in your wings to soar.
  • Persist until you succeed, but also know when it’s wise to quit.
  • Earn respect by respecting yourself first.
  • Demand more of yourself than anyone else could ever imagine expecting of you.
  • Pursue excellence in the 5 F’s of your life—Faith, Family, Finances, Fitness, and Friendships. Weakness in any area puts your entire life out of balance.
  • Stretch your comfort zone daily. Life’s best opportunities lie on the other side of fear.
  • Embrace failure, but don’t repeat it.
  • Celebrate success, but don’t rest on it.
  • Live each day with urgency—and patience.
  • Don’t worry about the failure that could be. Worry about the regret that’s guaranteed if you don’t try.
  • Stay grounded by deepening your faith.
  • Accomplish big goals with small steps.
  • Thank those who doubted you.
  • Inspire others to break through their barriers to success by breaking through your own.
  • Reject rejection. People don’t reject you as a person. They reject your words, ideas, offer, or product. Don’t take it personally.
  • Always Be Serving
  • Solve people’s problems, and you’ll never be unemployed.
  • Treat everyone with dignity and respect—especially your enemies and critics.
  • Dress to show respect.
  • Surround yourself with people who raise your game.
  • Find joy in the journey-especially your struggles.
  • Fear mediocrity, not failure.
  • Learn how- and when-to say no.

Making it count

-Karthik Gurumurthy

18262 days in this planet. and starting 18263rd day here. Thankful to amazing parents, wife, brother, teachers, friends and family for being there throughout this journey. My journey would have ended in 3176 days if not for all the Blessings and prayers from parents. 

There’s something about milestone birthdays that make us reflect. And as great as it is to look back and be grateful for all the experiences that have shaped who I am today, I’m even more excited to look forward at what’s yet to come. You see, if there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that every day is a gift. We only get one life, and it’s up to us to decide how to spend our time. Working on making each day count for making a positive impact to make sure dash counted for something good. Don’t let people scare you. 50 is amazing!

I have more life experience than ever before.
I know myself better than ever before.
I have more meaningful relationships, and a purpose that drives me to get up and be excited about my work.
I have no idea what aging gracefully means, but aging happily is pretty sweet.

My wife Shobana was so thoughtful and kind to reach out to my long list of students and created an amazing video which made my day. I can't imagine the amount of work that went for creating that. It was lovely to see students from different timelines joining hands. Awesome to see everyone. Thank you, Shobana. It was the best Birthday gift, ever.

Spending time with my mom, son and wife. What more can I ask for? I do miss my dad, though. But I know he is there with me all the time guiding us every step on a day-to-day basis.

My advice is don’t get so busy with life that you forget to live. Spend your time wisely and invest in the things and people worth your time and energy.

  • It's an opportunity to reflect and share some life lessons.
  • The world is not black and white. Life is full of complexities and nuances, shades of gray that make every situation unique. Embrace the ambiguity and learn to navigate through it.
  • Getting along is more important than being right. You don't always have to win every argument. Sometimes, maintaining relationships and harmony is far more essential.
  • Nothing is more important than family. They are your rock in times of storm, your source of joy and balance. Cherish them.
  • Elevation requires separation. Go work on yourself.
  • There is a difference between giving your kids the you never had vs. giving them the things you never needed.
  • Carpe diem: Seize the day, seize the moment, seize the opportunity. Make the most out of every day.
  • Let go of what you can't control. Worrying about things beyond your control only drains your energy. Focus on what you can influence and let the rest unfold as it will.

As I step into the second half-century of my life, I carry these lessons close to my heart. Hoping they resonate with you too.

Thankful and  feeling Blessed for everything. I have been blessed abundantly in every facet of life. I couldn't have asked for more.

When I was born 50 years ago today, my parents certainly rejoiced in the gift of my life. Today, I know that what I most desire—for my life to have significance, to add value, to be coherent—is not an achievement but a gift.


Learning agility

-Karthik Gurumurthy

Helen Tupper and Sarah Ellis shared yesterday in HBR about how to be an agile learner. 

What is learning agility?

Learning agility is the skill of learning from experiences so you can succeed in new situations. For example, a leader with learning agility can successfully transfer their talents across different parts of an organization. And individuals with high learning agility become the trusted “go-tos” for high-profile projects and high-impact positions. An agile learner can successfully navigate two different types of newness: complex work with no blueprint and situations where they have no previous experience. Where some people struggle with the high levels of ambiguity that newness creates, agile learners take advantage of the opportunity and succeed in situations where other people might stall.

Agile learners are adept at empathizing with and even anticipating different perspectives. By putting themselves in other people’s shoes, they can connect dots, spot and resolve potential conflicts, and zoom out to see the bigger picture. Rather than waiting to be told a different point of view or that something won’t work, agile learners seek out dissenting opinions and are open-minded in their approach. 

Agile learners have high levels of self-awareness. They understand their impact and seek insight on how they can improve. They are specific about the support they need and confident enough to ask for help from others so they can be at their best. They see learning as a constant and are proactively curious about the world around them, borrowing brilliance from different people and places.

Questions to ask ourselves about our learning agility:

  • How often do I work on something for the first time?
  • When have I spent time in my courage zone (i.e., doing something I find “scary”) over the past three months?
  • How do I respond when priorities and plans change without warning?
  • Who do I have conversations with to learn about people and teams I have limited knowledge of?
  • How confident am I in high-challenge conversations, where people have different points of view?
  • How much cognitive diversity (i.e., people who bring a variety of different experiences, perspectives) do I have in my career community?
  • How do I feel about asking for the help I need to succeed?
  • Where do my strengths have the most impact in the work that I do?
  • How frequently do I ask for feedback on what I do well, and how I could improve my impact?

 

 


Congratulations, Australia! Better luck next time, India

-Karthik Gurumurthy

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Congratulations Team India on this incredible journey of winning 10 games in a row, creating unforgettable moments and made us proud. The final result may not have been in our favor, but you created unforgettable moments and made us proud!
 
Anybody who's a true cricket aficionado will know that yesterday we were done in by the conditions! Well and truly done in!
Please don't blame even a single player. That's quite unfair.
 
I'm definitely speculating here, but I would have bet if Aussies batted first, they would have lost.
 
It's what all of us thought were quintessential Indian conditions. Low and slow wicket. Dry wicket taking spin early and one needing hard attritional cricket. Something that the Indian team does very well. Was it our own doing? Meaning, did the BCCI curators play a part in it, as it requires ICC to agree too? Or was it just ill-fated timing as by the end of a large tournament there mostly used pitches and not much can be done to freshen them up anyway?
 
From what I could see, when batting, the Indians didn't put a foot wrong. We had a good start- 80 for 2 in 10. The moment Shreyas Iyer's wicket fell early, KL and Kohli had to buckle down and play with caution till at least the 30th over. Say, in the name of playing bold cricket we would have been 90 for 5, then the game would have been lost right there! We would have had Shami coming into bat with 30 overs left!!!
 
So we did it just right. And the slow pitch wasn't helping us even get the ball off the square. so much that Marsh & Head, their part-time bowlers, bowled 4 overs between them for 10 runs! That we got to 240 was a pretty good effort given the conditions. And then when the Aussies started batting, they had to face a huge challenge too in the 1st 15 overs and that's why the match was evenly poised till then. And then the ball started coming on nicely, completely negating our bowling! By the 30th over the match was gone.
 
In the very 1st world cup match between England and NZ at the same venue, the latter had chased down England's target with ridiculous ease!! We had even seen it in the IPL. At the Wankhede and Ahmedabad, it gets much easier to chase under the lights.
 
One can't help but feel sorry for the players. As a team we are better than the current Australian team. The toss and the conditions favored Australia yesterday and the champions that they are made full use of it & won!
 
Just absolutely stunned at how Rahul Dravid can turn up an hour after a soul-crushing final defeat after two years of hard work, and still answer all sorts of questions with honesty, dignity, and even a smile. 
 
A message for every one of us, lets uplift each other!! I feel for my team, I hope they find comfort around their family and for fans, let us uplift each other instead of bringing each other down!!

SAT Update- Aarathi

-Karthik Gurumurthy

Another exciting update from Aarathi. Aarathi's score improved tremendously in her November exam as compared to August. I am so happy for her as she worked hard to constantly improve and adapt. Wishing her grand success to get admitted to school of her choice.


SAT Update- Sreesh

-Karthik Gurumurthy

Got an update from Sreesh few minutes back that he got a perfect score in Math and 760 in the English section of SAT. This was not a surprise at all as he was working hard, being consistent and did everything I recommended. Success is predictable. Thank you, God, for all your Blessings.


Nobel Prize award Chemistry-2023

-Karthik Gurumurthy 

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for this year was awarded jointly to three scientists who revolutionized the field by discovering and developing quantum dots:

  • Moungi G. Bawendi: American, received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1993. He currently serves as the Lester Wolfe Professor of Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • Louis E. Brus: American, earned his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1972. He continues to work as the Samuel Ruben and Dorothy P. Ruben Professor of Chemistry at Columbia University.
  • Aleksey Yekimov: Russian, obtained his Ph.D. in Physics from the A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute in 1980. He is currently the Head of the Laboratory of Semiconductor Nanostructures at the St. Petersburg State University.

Their Contributions:

These three laureates were jointly recognized for their pioneering work on quantum dots, tiny semiconductor particles with unique optical and electronic properties. Their independent discoveries and subsequent advancements in synthesizing and manipulating these particles opened up a wide range of potential applications across various fields.

  • Bawendi revolutionized the chemical production of quantum dots, making them brighter, more stable, and easier to control, paving the way for their widespread use.
  • Brus was one of the first researchers to synthesize quantum dots and played a crucial role in understanding their physical and chemical properties.
  • Yekimov independently discovered quantum dots and made significant contributions to elucidating their unique optical behavior.

Their collective work on quantum dots has had a profound impact on diverse fields, and their ongoing research holds immense promise for future advancements in various technologies, from energy generation and healthcare to electronics and communications.


Annie L' Huillier-Nobel Prize Physics 2023

-Karthik Gurumurthy

Annie L'Huillier was unreachable on the morning of the 2023 Nobel Prize in Physics.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences tried reaching L'Huillier to tell her she was one of the 2023 physics laureates. However, her phone kept going to voicemail.

Luckily, they were able to reach L'Huillier's husband. He explained that she was teaching a class on atomic physics, but she would have only a very short break just before the announcement.

During the break, L'Huillier picked up her phone and received the news about the physics prize, but she cut the call short to return to her students. Before going back to class, she turned her phone off again.

When she returned to the class, she told the students she would have to finish a few minutes early but did not give a reason.

L'Huillier ended the lecture only five minutes before the 11:45 physics announcement and left the room. Suspicious, her students decided to stay and watch the physics livestream in the lecture hall.

When L'Huillier's name was announced, her students broke into cheers. Annie L'Huillier's dedication to her students and her passion for teaching atomic physics is truly admirable. Her students must have been thrilled to witness their teacher's moment of recognition during the Nobel Prize announcement. It's a testament to her commitment to education and her contributions to the field of physics.

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Courtesy Photos: Nobel Prize.org 

Anne L'Huillier teaching her atomic physics class on 3 October; Anne L'Huillier taking a call with Nobel Prize Outreach on 3 October; Anne L'Huillier's atomic physics class cheering as her name is announced during the 2023 physics announcement.


Kinkaku-ji

-Karthik Gurumurthy

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Rokuon-ji  commonly known as "Kinkaku-ji", is a Zen temple of Shokoku-ji school of Rinzai Buddhist denomination. It's famous for its breathtaking Golden Pavilion, a three-story structure covered in shimmering gold leaf that reflects beautifully on the surrounding pond. This area used to be the Salonji family's villa. In 1397, "Yoshimitsu", the third Shogun of Ashikaga Shogunate, took it over and built the Kitayama palace  centering around the golden stupa, "Kinkaku". When the Kitayama palace was founded, it was the center of politics and culture and was used to welcome the Emperors of Japan and trading partners from China (Ming).

After he passed away, it became a temple according to his will. Rokuon-ji Temple garden, designated both a Special Historic site and a Special place of Scenic Beauty. They have retained the atmosphere of those days and maintained it really well. Throughout its history, Kinkakuji has faced its share of challenges. It has burned down several times, most notably in 1950 by a deranged monk. Each time, however, the temple was meticulously rebuilt, ensuring its stunning beauty continues to captivate visitors from around the world.  It was registered as World Cultural Heritage site in 1994.

Here are some interesting facts about Kinkakuji:

  • The Golden Pavilion is covered in approximately 200 square meters of gold leaf.
  • The pond in front of the pavilion is called Kyōko-chi (Mirror Pond) and is said to reflect the Pure Land of Buddhism.

SAT Update: Alex

-Karthik Gurumurthy

Alex C got a perfect score (1600) in SAT. Not surprising at all. I have been working with him last 1.5 years and he was consistent in his preparation despite his summer internship. Winners find a way to make it happen. 


Thought for the day

-Karthik Gurumurthy

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“Choose a day as your day of simplicity. Speak little, and listen with attention. Do something incognito and nice for a person you are close to. Eat simple and natural food. Create time periods for not doing anything – just walk, look around, live the  moment. Have your mind open to a more profound and silent sensitivity. Appreciate each scene and each person as they are.”


No Gasoline zone

-Karthik Gurumurthy

Life is different in every country, and traveling opens your eyes to all living conditions. Traveling puts into perspective your blessings and privileges as well as facing the harsh realities that many people live with.

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Rosenborg Castle

-Karthik Gurumurthy

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Rosenborg was built as a pleasure palace by Christian IV at the beginning of the 17th century, and quickly became the king's favorite castle. Christian IV left a deep impression on Danish history through his colorful personality, building projects and waging of war.

Christian IV ruled the counry together with the Privy council, but absolutism was introduced with his son Frederik III in 1660. Many of the furnishings in the castle reflect the pomp of the absolute monarchy. 

From the 1700s Rosenborg was no longer used as a residence, but became the place where the kings placed their oldest. finest and rarest objects. Here the king's guests could see the wealth  and status of the Danish-Norwegian kingdom in Europe. Rosenborg opened to the public as a museum in 1838. This displays the king's lavish collection of valuables, often acquired as  gifts from foreign rulers.


Why Travel?

-Karthik Gurumurthy

Traveling forces you to break out of your daily routine and all that you are familiar with. It might be uncomfortable, scary even; however, the rewards are worth it. The knowledge and experience you gain will outweigh any self-doubt and worry you had before you began traveling.

Travel also forces you to self-reflect and understand yourself as a person. As a result, you will be more prone to being open and comfortable expressing yourself without worrying about others’ approval.

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Round Tower-Copenhagen

-Karthik Gurumurthy

Disvoveries have been made in the Round Tower. Institutions have started here. Important historical figures have come here. And people from all walks of life have passed each other in search of Copenhagen's most charming  view 34.8 metres above the street. The whole world is passing through the Round Tower and has done so since 1642, when the tower was finished. For centuries , the views of the city's roofs and sights from the top of the Round Tower have been Copenhagen's major attractions.

With its distinctive Spiral Ramp, the Round Tower is one of Denmark's best-known and most visited structures. It was built as a platform  for the university observatory and for centuries it was the centre of Danish Astronomy.  The foundation stone was laid on July 7, 1637 (344 years later MS, Dhoni was born which is a different story altogether). Five years later the Round Tower was finished as the first part of the Trinity complex, which was designed to accommodate three things : the observatory at the top of the tower, the University library above the Trinity church and the church itself  below.

The Round Tower is built by King Christian IV, who constructed its round walls in the royal colors yellow and red. The king himself also sketched the famous golden rebus on the front of the tower: Lead , God, the right teachings and justice into the heart of King Christian IV.

Halfway up the tower you will find the library Hall since its reopening in 1987. The platform on top of the tower has a great 360 degree city view  centred by the Observatory, which is still used in the winter months and thus the oldest functioning observatory in Europe.

The Spiral ramp twists 7 1/2 times around the tower's hollow core and is the only way to the top. It is inspired by both German Renaissance castles and ancient structures and is unique in a Danish context. 

The Round Tower planetarium shows the solar system with the sun in the centre. The observatory telescope dates from 1929 when the current observatory building was opened 


Vasa

-Karthik Gurumurthy

The warship Vasa capsized and sank on its maiden voyage in Stockholm (about 395 years back) on 10 August 1628. After 333 years on the seabed, the mighty ship was salvaged, and its voyage continued. Vasa is the world's best preserved 17th century ship, magnificiently adorned with hundreds of carved scupltures and 98% original.

If you visit Sweden, please do checkout Vasa Museum. I strongly recommend watching the short film about Vasa and take the guided tour around the ship.  All around the ship, there are exhibitions that tell the story of Vasa's history and what the artefacts, sources can tell us about the ship, people and society in early 17th century Sweden, The order you visit the different exhibitions is for you to decide. 


Why Travel?

-Karthik Gurumurthy

Life is constantly changing. Setting up rigid rules and expectations will leave you disappointed. Travel teaches you to go through life with a sense of wonder, live in the moment, and learn to be comfortable in an ever-changing environment

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Christiansborg Palace

-Karthik Gurumurthy

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Christiansborg Palace was the main residence of Danish monarches until 1794,when the royal family moved to Amalienborg. However, even today the royal family still use large parts of Christiansborg Palace.

If you visit the Christiansborg Palace in Copenhagen, you will be given a tour of the kitchen beneath the palace where it gleams with one of the Europe's largest collection of copper kitchenware. You will experience a sensory bombardment of culinary artistry, pastry cakes and colorful flower arrangements from the 1930s.

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You will also get to explore the 800 year old underground ruins. The oldest ruin is the curtain wall from Bishop Absalon's 12th  century castle.Another famous ruin is the Blue Tower, the fabled prison from Copenhagen Castle.

The Royal reception rooms provide the magnificient setting for the Queen to carry out her official duties. Her Majesty receives her guests in these rooms surrounded by the green marble plasters, golden silk wall coverings and tapestries. She also signs acts of parliament into law and holds New Year banquets in the palace just as her predecessors have done over the centuries.

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At the heart of Christiansborg Palace lies  the Great Hall where the Queen holds the gala dinners when there are state visits and other festive occasions. Visitors can explore 1100 years of Danish History on the walls of the Great Hall which are decorated with colorful tapestries. The Great Hall can accommodate up to 400 guests for banquets, state visits and New Year receptions. The Danish artist Bjorn Norgaard's modern tapestries were a gift to Queen Margrethe II in 2000. They narrate 1000 years of Denmark's history, from Viking times to the present day.

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There is room called Alexander Hall which depicts the entry of Alexander the Great into Babylon. This also holds Queen's library which is Queen Margrethe II's book collection where many of the books date from the 18th century.

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Grundtvig's Church (Grundtvigs Kirke)

-Karthik Gurumurthy

This is a must see in Copenhagen.

Grundtvig's Church was erected in commemoration of the great Danish priest, poet, and reformer N.F.S. Grundtvig (1783 - 1882). This monumental church is referred to in modern terms as a Gothic cathedral.

Master builder and architect Peder Vilhelm Jensen Klint (1853 - 1930) died before the church was finished. The task was entrusted to his son architect and designer Kaare Klint (1888-1954), who completed the building of the church in 1940. Kaare Klint has also designed the chairs for the Grundtvig's Church - a chair made of beech wood with a wickerwork seat - a Danish furniture design.


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Amalienborg Palace and Marble Church

-Karthik Gurumurthy

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Amalienborg is the home of the Danish royal family, and is located in Copenhagen, Denmark.

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Inside Marble Church (Frederik's church)

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It consists of four identical classical palace façades with rococo interiors around an octagonal courtyard ; in the centre of the square is a monumental equestrian statue of Amalienborg's founder, King Frederick V.  Amalienborg was originally built for four noble families; however, when Christiansborg Palace burned on 26 February 1794, the royal family bought the palaces and moved in. Over the years various kings and their families have resided in the four different palaces.The Frederiksstaden district was built on the former grounds of two other palaces. The first palace was called Sophie Amalienborg. It was built by Queen Sophie Amalie, consort to Frederick III on part of the land which King Christian IV had acquired outside of Copenhagen's old walled city, now known as the Indre By district, in the early 17th century.

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Marble Church, also known as Frederik's Church, is a stunning Baroque church located in the Frederiksstaden district of Copenhagen, Denmark. It was designed by the architect Nicolai Eigtved and construction began in 1749, but was not completed until 1894 due to various interruptions and setbacks.Today, its turquoise dome stands as a captivating focal point in the Copenhagen skyline.


Why Travel?

-Karthik Gurumurthy

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Travel is the most amazing wrapped present - the inside is the transformation of you.

I travel because it makes my life so much better in many ways.

And because it makes my life rich and full with wonderful memories of cherished moments around the world with cherished people in beautiful settings.


Plagiarism-Everything you need to know

-Karthik Gurumurthy

About three decades back, I was fortunate to work on a research project at IGCAR with Dr. KS. Viswanathan. It is one of the best eye opening period of my life. Not only I learned how to work in a laboratory and different scientific methods/tools associated with it, I learned how to take notes and Dr. KSV spent quite a bit of time emphasizing on plagiarism. Up until that point of time, I didn't think much about it but Dr. KSV made all the research scholars in the lab  understand and shared the importance of how to cite an article and make sure you give credit to the original authors. This was one of the valuable lessons that I learned from Dr. KSV and am thankful to him for taking time to share te nuggets. 

Today I read an article titled "How to avoid the twelve types of Plagiarism" by Dr. Curtis Newbold who wrote about the same and am giving the link to actual article here. I am attaching the infographic (which I think is very useful) below for your reference. I have listened to Dr. Newbold in OReilly training sessions and find his teaching very helpful and useful.

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Source: thevisualcommunicationguy.com

 


Career in Science

-Karthik Gurumurthy

This is a personal message from 2022 chemistry laureate Carolyn Bertozzi to all young researchers on why to aspire for a career in science:

”I would want to share with them how a life in science is incredibly rewarding. It is rewarding because it is creating. You are discovering knowledge and gifting that to humanity for all of prosperity. Because once you learn something no one can take that way. It is not an object. It is in intellectual currency that will be shared throughout the generations. And you created that. It has a permanency that ironically a physical object doesn’t have. You can paint a painting, but eventually it will fade. But knowledge doesn’t fade. Knowledge stays with us forever and it becomes the foundation for the next generations.”

NobelPrizeChem_2022

Courtesy: Nobelprize.org


Happy Birthday, MSD!

-Karthik Gurumurthy

From Ranchi's heart, a legend did arise,

With gloves and willow, fire in his eyes.

M.S. Dhoni, Captain Cool they'd say,

Calm in the storm, leading the way.

 

Flick of the wrist, a six soared high,

Hope rekindled, beneath the summer sky.

Helicopter shot, a defiant roar,

Pressure defused, asking for more.

 

Behind the stumps, a keen mind at play,

Reading the game, each ball the prey.

Lightning throws, a blur in the air,

Wickets claimed, with a nonchalant flair.

 

Captaining India, with a quiet grace,

World Cups won, etching his place.

Under his helm, heroes were made,

A team transformed, their doubts all laid.

 

From humble beginnings, a giant he grew,

Inspiring millions, dreams coming true.

More than just runs, or wickets taken,

A leader, a mentor, a spirit unshaken.

 

Through cheers and boos, he held his ground,

Never a showman, never a sound.

His presence, a talisman, strong and true,

The heartbeat of cricket, in blue and white hue.

 

So raise a glass, to the man in yellow,

For MS Dhoni, a story to tell.

His legend etched in every score,

Forever remembered, forevermore.


Remembering Marie Curie

-Karthik Gurumurthy

89 years back, the world lost one of the greatest scientists:: Marie Skłodowska Curie.

MarieCurie

Photo: Courtesy: Nobelprize.org

Curie dedicated her life to science. She was the first woman to be awarded a Nobel Prize, the first person to be awarded twice and is still the only person to receive the prize in two different scientific fields.